ROYAL RUSSIA NEWS. THE ROMANOV DYNASTY & THEIR LEGACY, MONARCHY, HISTORY OF IMPERIAL & HOLY RUSSIA
« July 2017 »
S M T W T F S
1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31
Entries by Topic
All topics  «
400th Anniversary
A Russian Moment
Alapaevsk
Alexander I
Alexander II
Alexander III
Alexander Mikhailovich, GD
Alexander Palace
Alexandra Feodorovna
Alexandra Nicholayevna, GD
Alexandra Pavlovna GD
Amber Room
Andrei Vladimirovich, GD
Anna Feodorovna, GD
Anna Ioannovna, Empress
Anna Leopoldovna
Anna Pavlovna, GD
Antiques
Architecture
Auctions
Bagrations
Beautiful Orthodox Churches
Benckendorff, Count Paul
Bolsheviks
Bolshoi
Books
Catherine II
Chavchavadze
Chekhov
Collectibles
Conspiracy Theories
Constantine Constantinovich, GD
Cossacks
Country Estates
Crimea
Dmitri Pavlovich, GD
Dmitri Romanovich
Documentaries
Dowager Empress Maria
Eagar, Margaretta
Easter
Ekaterinburg
Ekaterinburg Remains
Elena Vladimirovna, GD
Elizabeth Feodorovna GD
Elizabeth Petrovna, Empress
Events
Exhibitions
Faberge
Frederiks, Count Vladimir
Ganima Yama
GARF
Gatchina
George Alexandrovich, GD
Gibbes, Charles Sidney
Grand Duchess Xenia Alexa
Grand Dukes
Holy Royal Martyrs
Imperial Russia
Ivan IV, Tsar
Jewels
Kazan Cathedral
Kerensky, Alexander
Kolchak, Admiral
Kolomenskoye
Konstantin Nikolayevich, GD
Kostroma
Kremlin
Kronstadt
Kulikovsky
Livadia
Maria Alexandrovna
Maria Feodorovna, Empress
Maria Pavlovna, Senior
Maria Vladimirovna GD
Marie Georgievna, GD
Massandra
Mikhail Alexandrovich GD
Mikhail Nikolayevich, GD
Moscow
Museums
Nevsky, Alexander
News
Nicholas Alexandrovich GD
Nicholas I
Nicholas II
Nicholas Mikhailovich, GD
Nicholas Nicholayevich, GD
Nicholas Romanovich
Nobility
Numismatics
Oldenburg
Oleg Konstantinovich, Prince
Olga Alexandrovna GD
Olga Konstantinovna GD
Olga Nicholayevna GD
Oranienbaum
Ostankino
OTMA
Palaces
Paley, Princess Natalia
Paul Alexandrovich, GD
Paul Gilbert
Paul I, Emperor
Pavlovsk
Peter and Paul Fortress
Peter II
Peter III
Peter Nicholayevich, GD
Peter the Great
Peterhof
Prince Michael of Kent
Pushkin
Rasputin
Romanov
Romanov Descendants
Romanov Family Album
Ropsha
Royal Russia
Ruriks
Russian Art
Russian Church
Russian Cuisine
Russian Film
Russian History
Russian Imperial House
Russian Monarchy
Russian Orders
Russo-Japanese War
Sergei Alexandrovich GD
St. Petersburg
St. Theodore's Church
State Hermitage Museum
Stieglitz, Alexander
Stolypin, Pyotr
Strelna
Succession
Tauride Palace
Tobolsk
Tsaritsino
Tsarskoye Selo
Tsesarevich Alexei
Vera Konstantinovna, Princess
Vladimir Alexandrovich, GD
Vyrubova, Anna
Winter Palace
Witte, Sergei
World War I
Wrangel, Pyotr
Xenia Alexandrovna GD
Yachts
Yalta
Yelagin Palace
Yusupov
Blog Tools
Edit your Blog
Build a Blog
RSS Feed
View Profile
You are not logged in. Log in
Saturday, 22 July 2017
Ipatiev House Recreated in 3D by Ekaterinburg Museum
Topic: Ekaterinburg

 
Nikolai Neuymin, head of the Romanov history department of the Sverdlovsk regional local history museum

This article was researched from Russian and English media sources and written by Paul Gilbert, Founder of Royal Russia © 2017

A new 3-dimensional computer mock-up on a 50-inch screen of the Ipatiev House has been developed by the staff of the Sverdlovsk regional local history museum in Ekaterinburg. Emperor Nicholas II and his family lived out their final 78 days in the Ipatiev House, as captives of the Bolsheviks after the revolutions of 1917. 

The house has been carefully brought back to life in minute detail based on historic photographs, taken before the building was destroyed. The new technology allows users to see where the Imperial family lived as well as the room in which they were murdered.

It was in the cellar of the Ipatiev House where Nicholas II, his wife Alexandra Feodorovna, their five children, and four faithful retainers were murdered on the night of 16/17 July 1918.

The video is the only way people can get a glimpse of one of the darkest pages in 20th century Russian history due to the house being razed in 1977. It was bulldozed on the orders of Boris Yeltsin - the then local Communist Party head who would later become the first president of the Russian Federation after the fall of the Soviet Union. There were growing concerns by Communist officials in Moscow that the house was steadily becoming a place of pilgrimage for those who wished to honour the memory of the Imperial family.

The Ipatiev House stood on the corner of the former Voznesensky Prospect and Voznesensky Pereulok, Today the Chuch-on-the-Blood stands on the spot.

Nikolai Neuymin, head of the Romanov history department of the Sverdlovsk regional local history museum, told the Siberian Times: “A particular feature of the project is that we've used real photos from the investigation of [Nikolai] Sokolov that are kept at Russia's State Archive".

"The employees of our museum developed the 3D reconstruction of the house of engineer Ipatiev," said Neuymin. 

"We recreated the interiors of the rooms, and you can walk through all of them including the gloomy room where the tsar and his family were shot dead."

Specialists painstakingly recreated both the exterior and interior of the Ipatiev House as it looked in 1918. With advanced 3D and interactive technologies, users today can not only see the decoration of historically significant objects, but can immerse themselves in the atmosphere of the time. 

In addition, the technology allows users to implement a host of other functions as desired. For example, when you press a button, you can show the area before and after construction; change the materials and shape of the facades, view hidden interiors of the building, and more. 

On the night of 16/17 July, 1918 the Tsar and his family were awoken by their family physican Dr Botkin on the orders of Soviet guards.

They were lied to and told that they had to be evacuated from the city because the White forces – which at the time were fighting with the Bolsheviks – who were advancing on the city.

The Romanovs, their doctor and three other servants were led down a flight of stairs, into the courtyard of the Ipatiev House and through a ground-floor entrance to the small semi-basement room at the rear of the building.

Tsar Nicholas II and his wife were provided with chairs while the rest of the family stood behind and to one side of them, with the exception of tsesarevich and heir Alexei - who suffered from haemophilia – who sat on his father’s lap.
 

©  Paul Gilbert @ Royal Russia. 22 July, 2017
 

 

Posted by Paul Gilbert at 3:49 PM EDT
Updated: Saturday, 22 July 2017 6:03 PM EDT
Permalink | Share This Post

Newer | Latest | Older